If you would like to learn more about Día de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead, join the Sunday Speaker Series presentation titled, “La celebración de la muerte: una perspectiva histórica hasta la actualidad” (Celebration of Death: A Historical Perspective),” with Edna Ochoa Sunday, Oct. 27, at 2 p.m.

Ochoa, a professor at the University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley, will host the presentation in Spanish. She will contextualize the origins and history of the popular holiday, Día de los Muertos, which is more than its colorful decorations and skulls.

Ochoa is an associate professor in the Department of Modern Languages and Literature at the University of Texas-Rio Grande Valley. She received the 2009 College of Arts and Humanities Provost Award for Latin American Studies. Her teaching and research interests include Chicana/o literature, theater, creative writing and Spanish language journalism.

She earned a bachelor’s in journalism from the Escuela “Carlos Septién García” in Mexico City, and a master’s and doctorate degree in Spanish from the University of Houston. She is author of many books including “La cerca circular.” Her translations to Spanish include “Zoot Suit” by Luis Valdez (2004) and “How the Frog and His Friend Saved Humanity” by Víctor Villaseñor (2005). She is also a performer, director and playwright. Her essays have been published in several books and journals.

Sunday Speaker Series is included in the fee for regular museum admission. FRIENDS of MOSTHistory are admitted free as a benefit of FRIENDship and must present their FRIENDship card at the Admissions Desk.

This program is made possible with generous support from the Carmen C. Guerra Endowment. Mrs. Guerra was deeply committed to supporting educational opportunities in the Rio Grande Valley. This named endowment was created at the museum by her family to honor her memory and to continue her commitment to providing opportunities for education to the community.